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Socio-economic category:
High deprivation
Socio-economic category: High deprivation

Soc&Env: Education and training: Local inequalities data for free school meals (FSM) and disadvantaged pupils

This subsection describes socio-economic inequalities in educational attainment, including those pupils who are eligible for free school meals (a key indicator of socio-economic disadvantage), as well as those classified as ‘disadvantaged’ by the DfE. Instead of using free school meals (FSM) alone as an indicator, DfE classifies pupils as ‘disadvantaged’ if they have been eligible …

Soc&Env: Living standards: Local data on deprivation

Based on the locally preferred measure of deprivation, Hackney is the 11th most deprived local authority in England (of 326 local authorities) based on IMD2015.  On the same measure, the City of London is ranked 226 and is within the 40% least deprived local authorities in England and third least deprived in Greater London.  For …

Soc&Env: Living standards: Health and wellbeing impacts by deprivation

It is well documented that people living in more deprived areas live shorter and unhealthier lives. The Marmot Review reported that average life expectancy in England is seven years lower in the poorest areas compared to the richest communities and disability-free life expectancy is 17 years lower.  Figure 2 below shows associations between area deprivation …

Soc&Env: Local inequalities data on housing by socio-economic differences

The national Memorandum of Understanding on health, social care and housing notes that:  “The home is a driver of health inequalities, and those living in poverty are more likely to live in poorer housing, precarious housing circumstances or lack accommodation altogether.” Hackney is the sixth most ‘housing deprived’ local authority in England, based on the …

CYP: Local inequalities data on the use of clinical services by Socio-economic disadvantage

Nationally, deprivation is associated with an increased risk of childhood unintentional injury. Children from socio-economically disadvantaged families have been shown to have an increased rate of accidents and injuries than those from more affluent families. Death rates for injury and poisoning have fallen for all social groups except the poorest, and children in these families …