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Section category:
Inequalities
Section category: Inequalities

CYP: Physical Health: Inequalities

The following section presents data on physical health by population demographic categories that may highlight inequalities. The section is framed around the following topics: Age Gender Ethnicity Sexuality Socio-economic disadvantage Location Vulnerable groups  

CYP: Best Start in Life: Inequalities: Child and maternal health by location

The analysis of within-area inequalities presented below is based on data from each of the six Children’s Centre areas (explained in Introduction section). There were no differences in rates of low birthweight observed over the different geographic areas. Residents of Children’s Centre area A have broadly better outcomes than the rest of the borough – …

CYP: Local inequalities data on maternal health by age

Broadly, health inequalities appear to be most pronounced in those giving birth under the age of 20 and over the age of 40. Those under 20 are more likely to smoke, more likely to have low birthweight babies and less likely to breastfeed. They are also slightly more likely to be recorded as having poor …

CYP: Local inequalities data on maternal health by ethnicity

Birth rates Figure 7 shows that Asian and Black residents have similar overall birth rates (52 per 1,000 women aged 15-49 for Asian residents and 53 per 1,000 for Black residents), and both groups’ birth rates peak in the 25-29 and 30-34 age brackets. In Asian residents, the peak is 84 per 1,000 women aged …

CYP: The Best Start in Life: Inequalities

A full and detailed examination of inequalities observed in Hackney and the City can be found in the 0-5 needs assessment published in 2016.  This section highlights a small amount of additional contextual information around birth rates and then summarises the key results of the needs assessment. Please note that preterm birth data and infant …

How alcohol consumption varies by socio-economic disadvantage

The Causes and risk factors section reported that people in professional jobs and on higher incomes are more likely to be drinking at ‘increasing risk’ levels. Data from the Hackney resident health and wellbeing survey are consistent with these findings, showing that high risk drinking (based on calculated AUDIT-C scores) is less common among adults …

How alcohol consumption varies by ethnicity

Local survey data also show notable variation in drinking behaviour across different ethnic groups, as illustrated in Figure 10. In the Hackney resident health and wellbeing survey, high risk drinkers were most likely to be from White backgrounds, while non-drinking was particularly common among Asian and Black respondents compared to White respondents, which may reflect …

How alcohol consumption varies by gender

As alluded to in the Causes and risk factors section, there are clear differences in drinking behaviours by gender. According to the Hackney resident health and wellbeing survey, men in Hackney are more likely to be high risk drinkers than women, based on calculated survey AUDIT-C scores (Figure 8). Men are also more likely to …

How alcohol consumption varies by age

National evidence suggests that older people on average drink more regularly than younger people, although binge drinking is more common in younger age groups (see Cause and risk factors section). Locally, there are also marked differences in drinking patterns across age groups, according to responses to the Hackney resident health and wellbeing survey. As shown …

Alcohol – Inequalities

Local data available through resident surveys show wide variation in drinking behaviours in different population groups. In many cases, comparable data are not available for the City of London, but where possible it has been included. It is worth noting the very wide confidence intervals on some of the data presented, which is due to …