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Section category:
Evidence / good practice
Section category: Evidence / good practice

CYP: Physical Health: Evidence and good practice

The evidence and good practice relating to the physical health of children and young people has been framed around the following headings: Prevention of poor physical health Vaccine-preventable diseases Obesity Dental health Substance misuse Sexual and reproductive health Identification and early intervention of poor physical health Obesity Dental health Sexual and reproductive health Treatment, care …

Alcohol – What might work: areas of limited evidence

Media campaigns Media campaigns and associated population level interventions may be designed to increase alcohol awareness and reduce alcohol-related harm, by influencing people’s perceptions and behaviours. One example of a national campaign is Dry January. Use of ‘new’ media (e.g. through mobile phone apps) is also used to encourage people to change their drinking behaviour. …

Alcohol policy – licensing, price, enforcement and advertising

Making changes to the environment where risky behaviour takes place has the potential to reduce harmful outcomes.  This includes action such as controlling alcohol sales, pricing or the density and number of outlets  A recent review of evidence by Public Health England found that policies that reduce the affordability of alcohol are the most effective, …

Alcohol – Workplace approaches

The workplace presents a vital opportunity to encourage and facilitate health behaviours around alcohol and other substances. The London Healthy Workplace Charter provides a framework for action to help employers build good practice in health and work in their organisation. The business benefits of having a healthy, fit and committed workforce are widely recognised. These …

Alcohol – Building resilience: personal and social skills

Resilience, or the capacity to do well in the face of adversity, is positively associated with strong social networks – i.e. family, friends and community. Alongside enhancing protective attitudes and behaviours, building resilience through reinforcing social connections can challenge alcohol misuse as a way of coping with stress. While older people are more likely to …

Alcohol – Community centred approaches

There can be value in using community-centred approaches to improve health and wellbeing, promote equity and increase people’s control over their lives. Local communities have been identified as an important system in preventing alcohol-related problems and planning and implementing community prevention projects; community-centred approaches have good evidence of effectiveness across the life course (Table 11). Relevant …

Alcohol – Screening, identification and brief advice

For adults, NICE guidance advocates screening, brief advice and motivational support to identify and respond to alcohol misuse. ‘Identification and brief advice’ (IBA) in primary care has been shown to be effective in encouraging people drinking at higher risk levels to cut down, through screening and giving appropriate guidance.  Screening and brief advice has also …

Alcohol – Educational interventions

In terms of specific work with children and young people, evidence suggests that a ‘whole school’ approach should be adopted, covering everything from policy development and the school environment to staff training, with parents and pupils involved in developing and supporting this. This includes development of Personal, Social Health and Economic Education (PSHE) to cover …

Alcohol – Evidence and good practice

Overview of evidence Table 11 provides an overview of the efficacy of a range of interventions to prevent or reduce alcohol-related harm across the life course, ranging from universal interventions to those which are selective or targeted according to the level of risk or alcohol-related harm. Evidence suggests that a positive focus on encouraging lower …

Diet – Behaviour change

Improving food and dietary behaviours is complex and evidence suggests that there is no single best approach, but that a range of strategies are needed which should be informed by consumer research.  Social and peer norms Health behaviours which are shared with a social group, friends or family are deemed to be normal or ‘the …