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Age category:
Older adults
Age category: Older adults

Soc&Env: Transport and travel: Local inequalities data by age

Figure 2, Figure 3 and Figure 4 show London level data on mode of travel by age band, presenting data separately for bus and underground, car drivers and passengers, and frequent cycling and walking.  The figures also compare the percentage of each band using each transport mode with the percentage of that age band in …

Soc&Env: Health and wellbeing impacts of traffic congestion, emissions and noise

The growth in population, housing and employment, both within the local area and in neighbouring boroughs, has obvious implications for transport demand and for congestion on Hackney and the City’s busy transport network. Poor air quality resulting from vehicle emissions in congested areas is harmful to health. In 2010, an estimated 9,416 deaths in Londoners …

Health outcomes of poor diet

The Adult health and illness chapter of the JSNA describes the prevalence of a range of health conditions that are linked to poor diet (including coronary heart disease, diabetes and cancer).  The Children and young people JSNA chapter provides a similar commentary. Estimates from the recent Global Burden of Disease (GBD) report 2013, suggest that …

Alcohol-related A&E attendances and hospital admissions

This sub-section presents data on alcohol-related ambulance attendances and hospital admissions, which may be considered to be objective indicators of increasing levels of drinking in the local population. Alcohol-specific conditions are those where alcohol is causally implicated in all cases; for example, alcohol-induced behavioural disorders and alcohol-related liver cirrhosis. Alcohol-related conditions include all alcohol-specific conditions, …

Drinking patterns

The comparisons presented here are of drinking behaviour among adult residents (16+) living in different local authority areas, based on LAPE modelled estimates. These estimates are presented with a high degree of uncertainty as they are experimental data based on hospital admissions, population demographics, deaths related to alcohol and national survey data. Please note: None …

How alcohol consumption varies by socio-economic disadvantage

The Causes and risk factors section reported that people in professional jobs and on higher incomes are more likely to be drinking at ‘increasing risk’ levels. Data from the Hackney resident health and wellbeing survey are consistent with these findings, showing that high risk drinking (based on calculated AUDIT-C scores) is less common among adults …

How alcohol consumption varies by age

National evidence suggests that older people on average drink more regularly than younger people, although binge drinking is more common in younger age groups (see Cause and risk factors section). Locally, there are also marked differences in drinking patterns across age groups, according to responses to the Hackney resident health and wellbeing survey. As shown …

Alcohol – Unmet need

As well as AUDIT-C, the Hackney resident health and wellbeing survey also asked a question about adult residents’ perceptions of their drinking habits.  Table 4 shows that, again, a large proportion say they do not drink in response to this question (38%), while one third perceive themselves to be ‘sensible’ drinkers (33%). However, there is …

Alcohol-related ambulance call-outs and hospital admissions

Immediate consequences of higher risk drinking include accidents and anti-social behaviour. Table 2 and Table 3 below show the number (and rates where available) of alcohol-related ambulance attendances and hospital admissions in Hackney and the City of London. Please note that the population on which these data are based differs across the indicators: ambulance attendances and …

National estimates on drinking behaviour

In addition to local data collected via surveys, estimates of drinking behaviour in resident adults (age 16+) are available via the LAPE resource, which enables comparisons to be made between different areas (see Comparisons with other areas section).  This includes specific estimates of ‘increasing risk’ drinkers. As noted previously, this source uses a different definition …