Searching found 51 results

Age category:
Adults
Age category: Adults
Topic:
Lifestyle and behaviour
Topic: Lifestyle and behaviour

L&B: Local data on dietary Health outcomes

The Adult health and illness chapter of the JSNA describes the prevalence of a range of health conditions that are linked to poor diet (including coronary heart disease, diabetes and cancer).  The Children and young people JSNA chapter provides a similar commentary. Estimates from the recent Global Burden of Disease (GBD) report 2013, suggest that …

L&B: Alcohol: Evidence on Screening and brief advice

For adults, NICE guidance advocates screening, brief advice and motivational support to identify and respond to alcohol misuse. ‘Identification and brief advice’ (IBA) in primary care has been shown to be effective in encouraging people drinking at higher risk levels to cut down, through screening and giving appropriate guidance.  Screening and brief advice has also …

L&B: Alcohol: Evidence and good practice

Overview of evidence Table 11 provides an overview of the efficacy of a range of interventions to prevent or reduce alcohol-related harm across the life course, ranging from universal interventions to those which are selective or targeted according to the level of risk or alcohol-related harm. Evidence suggests that a positive focus on encouraging lower …

L&B: Alcohol: Comparisons of Alcohol-related A&E attendances

This sub-section presents data on alcohol-related ambulance attendances and hospital admissions, which may be considered to be objective indicators of increasing levels of drinking in the local population. Alcohol-specific conditions are those where alcohol is causally implicated in all cases; for example, alcohol-induced behavioural disorders and alcohol-related liver cirrhosis. Alcohol-related conditions include all alcohol-specific conditions, …

L&B: Alcohol: Comparisons of Drinking patterns

The comparisons presented here are of drinking behaviour among adult residents (16+) living in different local authority areas, based on LAPE modelled estimates. These estimates are presented with a high degree of uncertainty as they are experimental data based on hospital admissions, population demographics, deaths related to alcohol and national survey data. Please note: None …

L&B: Alcohol: Local inequalities data by Socioeconomic disadvantage

The Causes and risk factors section reported that people in professional jobs and on higher incomes are more likely to be drinking at ‘increasing risk’ levels. Data from the Hackney resident health and wellbeing survey are consistent with these findings, showing that high risk drinking (based on calculated AUDIT-C scores) is less common among adults …

L&B: Alcohol: Local inequalities data by Ethnicity

Local survey data also show notable variation in drinking behaviour across different ethnic groups, as illustrated in Figure 10. In the Hackney resident health and wellbeing survey, high risk drinkers were most likely to be from White backgrounds, while non-drinking was particularly common among Asian and Black respondents compared to White respondents, which may reflect …

L&B: Alcohol: Local inequalities data by Gender

As alluded to in the Causes and risk factors section, there are clear differences in drinking behaviours by gender. According to the Hackney resident health and wellbeing survey, men in Hackney are more likely to be high risk drinkers than women, based on calculated survey AUDIT-C scores (Figure 8). Men are also more likely to …

L&B: Alcohol: Local inequalities data by Age

National evidence suggests that older people on average drink more regularly than younger people, although binge drinking is more common in younger age groups (see Cause and risk factors section). Locally, there are also marked differences in drinking patterns across age groups, according to responses to the Hackney resident health and wellbeing survey. As shown …

L&B: Alcohol: Local data on unmet need

As well as AUDIT-C, the Hackney resident health and wellbeing survey also asked a question about adult residents’ perceptions of their drinking habits.  Table 4 shows that, again, a large proportion say they do not drink in response to this question (38%), while one third perceive themselves to be ‘sensible’ drinkers (33%). However, there is …