Jobs in Hackney and the City

The number of jobs has increased over the period 2010-2015 in both Hackney and the City of London.

Figure 11 shows the total number of people with Hackney-based jobs has increased by 26% from 86,000 in 2010 to 108,000 in 2015.

Hackney’s employment sector with the highest growth was ‘distribution, hotels and restaurants’, which grew by about 7,250 jobs over the period 2010-2015, or an increase of 60%. This was the highest growth both in absolute terms (number of jobs) and relative terms (percentage increase in number of jobs). Hackney’s biggest employment sectors, ‘banking, finance and insurance’ and ‘public admin, education and health’ (see Figure 1 in the Local employment data section) saw the joint second absolute growth in jobs, with an increase of around 6,000 jobs (about 25%) in both. 9

Figure 11: Number of people employed in Hackney over time (2010-2015)

Figure 11: Number of people employed in Hackney over time (2010-2015)

Source: ONS Business Register and Employment Survey

Figure 12 shows an increase of 27% in City employees from 345,000 in 2010 to 438,000 in 2015.

The largest increase in number of jobs was seen by the biggest sector, ‘banking, finance and insurance’ (see Figure 2 in local data section), which grew by around 67,000 jobs between 2010 and 2015, an increase of about 25%. The second largest increase in number of jobs was seen in the ‘transport and communication’ sector, which grew by around 15,000 jobs, or over 50%. 10

Figure 12: Number of people employed in the City of London over time (2010-2015)

Figure 12: Number of people employed in the City of London over time (2010-2015)

Source: ONS Business Register and Employment Survey

Employment among local residents

Overall, the employment rate among working age Hackney residents was similar in 2015 to many of Hackney’s statistical peers, as well as the London and England averages (Figure 13). 11  The employment rate in the City of London is similar to Hackney, but it is not possible to make a reliable comparison with other areas as no confidence intervals have been provided for this figure.

Figure 13: Resident employment rate (age 16-64, 2015)

Figure 13: Resident employment rate (age 16-64, 2015)

Source: ONS Annual Population Survey

Note: Period covered is slightly different to that used to describe employment rates and numbers in the local data.

Hackney’s employment rate improved relative to London between 2004 and 2009, and has remained broadly in line with the regional average since (Figure 14). The overall trend over the past decade in Hackney is towards higher employment and lower economic inactivity.  Trend data are not available for the City of London.

By sector, the largest increase in number of jobs held by Hackney residents in recent years was in the ‘distribution, hotels and restaurants’ industries – a growth of 6,300 jobs (37%) over the period 2009-2015. The second largest increase in number was in ‘public admin, education and health’ – an increase of 3,300 jobs (10%). The ‘transport and communication’ industries saw a decrease of 5,800 (32%) jobs held by Hackney residents. 12  Please note that these data are from a different source to that reported for ‘Jobs in Hackney and the City’ above and so cannot be directly compared.

Figure 14: Resident employment rate over time (age 16-64, 2004-2015)

Figure 14: Resident employment rate over time (age 16-64, 2004-2015)

Source: ONS Annual Population Survey

Occupation of employed Hackney residents

Figure 15 shows there are no statistically significant differences between the proportions of the Hackney and London resident populations in each of the SOC2010 occupation categories. However, both Hackney and London have more residents in the top three occupation categories (‘managers, directors and senior officials’, ‘professional occupations’ and ‘associate professional and technical’) than England. Data are not available for City of London residents.

Figure 15: Occupation levels of employed residents (2014)

Figure 15: Occupation levels of employed residents (2014)

Source: ONS Annual Population Survey

Self-employment

The proportion of employed Hackney residents age 16+ who are self-employed has remained fairly constant at around 20% over the period 2009 to 2015. The 2015 rate of 20% is not statistically significantly different from the London rate. 13

Equivalent data are not available for the City.

Part time work

The proportion of employed Hackney residents age 16-64 who work part-time has remained fairly constant at around 25% over the period 2009 to 2015. The 2015 rate of 24% is not statistically significantly different from the London rate. 14

Equivalent data are not available for the City.

Pay

Figure 16 shows that Hackney residents’ median gross hourly wage is not statistically significantly different from any of Hackney’s statistical peers, London or England. 15  Figure 17 shows that, in line with patterns in London and England, Hackney residents’ median gross hourly wage has fallen in ‘real terms’ (i.e. adjusted for inflation) over the period 2010-2016.

Comparable data are not available for the City.

Figure 16: Median gross hourly wage of employed residents (2016)

Figure 16: Median gross hourly wage of employed residents (2016)

Source: ONS Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings

Figure 17: Residents’ median gross hourly wage over time, adjusted for inflation (2008-2016)

Figure 17: Residents’ median gross hourly wage over time, adjusted for inflation (2008-2016)

Source: ONS Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings. Bank of England Inflation Calculator.

Figure 18 shows that the median gross hourly wage is higher for those working in the City of London than those working in London, England and most of Hackney’s statistical peers. The median gross hourly wage for those working in Hackney is not statistically significantly different from that in London, England, most of Hackney’s statistical peers, or the same measure for Hackney residents (Figure 16).

Figure 19 shows that the median gross hourly wage for those working in Hackney and in the City has decreased in real terms over the period 2010-2016. In both cases, it has done so more steeply than the decline across London as a whole, although the City of London median gross hourly wage has remained far above the average London level.

Figure 18: Median gross hourly wage of those working in each location (2016)

Figure 18: Median gross hourly wage of those working in each location (2016)

Source: ONS Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings

Figure 19: Median gross hourly wage of those working in each location over time, adjusted for inflation (2008-2016)

Figure 19: Median gross hourly wage of those working in each location over time, adjusted for inflation (2008-2016)

Source: ONS Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings. Bank of England Inflation Calculator. 16

Figure 20 shows that the unemployment rate in Hackney in 2015 was similar to its statistical peers, London and England.   The local unemployment rate has fallen from 11% in 2004, when it was statistically higher than the regional and national averages (Figure 21).  Data are not available for City of London residents.

Figure 20: Resident unemployment rate (age 16-64, 2015)

Figure 20: Resident unemployment rate (age 16-64, 2015)

Source: ONS Annual Population Survey

Figure 21: Resident unemployment rate over time (2004-2015)

Figure 21: Resident unemployment rate over time (2004-2015)

Source: ONS Annual Population Survey

Figure 22 shows that over a quarter of Hackney residents were economically inactive in 2015/16, which is higher than most of Hackney’s statistical peers, London and England.  Data are not available for City of London residents.

In Hackney, rates of economic inactivity have fallen significantly since 2005, from 41% to 29% in 2015 (Figure 23).

Figure 22: Resident economic inactivity rate (age 16-64, 2015)

Figure 22: Resident economic inactivity rate (age 16-64, 2015)

Source: ONS Annual Population Survey

Figure 23: Economic inactivity over time (age 16-64, 2004-2015)

Figure 23: Economic inactivity over time (age 16-64, 2004-2015)

Source: ONS Annual Population Survey

References

  1. Office for National Statistics, “Business Register and Employment Survey,” 2015.
  2. Office for National Statistics, “Business Register and Employment Survey,” 2015.
  3. Office for National Statistics, “Annual Population Survey,” 2016.
  4. Office for National Statistics, “Annual Population Survey,” 2016.
  5. Office for National Statistics, “Annual Population Survey,” 2016.
  6. Office for National Statistics, “Annual Population Survey,” 2016.
  7. Office for National Statistics, “Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings 2016”.
  8. Bank of England, “Inflation Calculator,” [Online]. Available: http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/education/Pages/resources/inflationtools/calculator/index1.aspx. [Accessed 14 December 2016].
  9. Office for National Statistics, “Business Register and Employment Survey,” 2015.
  10. Office for National Statistics, “Business Register and Employment Survey,” 2015.
  11. Office for National Statistics, “Annual Population Survey,” 2016.
  12. Office for National Statistics, “Annual Population Survey,” 2016.
  13. Office for National Statistics, “Annual Population Survey,” 2016.
  14. Office for National Statistics, “Annual Population Survey,” 2016.
  15. Office for National Statistics, “Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings 2016”.
  16. Bank of England, “Inflation Calculator,” [Online]. Available: http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/education/Pages/resources/inflationtools/calculator/index1.aspx. [Accessed 14 December 2016].