Figure 2, Figure 3 and Figure 4 show London level data on mode of travel by age band, presenting data separately for bus and underground, car drivers and passengers, and frequent cycling and walking. 8 The figures also compare the percentage of each band using each transport mode with the percentage of that age band in the London population. There are several observations that can be drawn from these figures, as follows.

  • Children make up a greater proportion of frequent cyclists than they do the London population, and a smaller proportion of frequent underground users. They are comparatively less likely than adults to be frequent underground users.
  • Those aged 25-44 make up a greater proportion of underground users and car drivers than they do the London population. Cycling and walking among this group, and those aged 45-59, appears to be proportional to their respective population shares.

 

Figure 2: Mode share of frequent users of bus and underground services, by age (2007/08 – 2009/10)

Bar chart showing percentages
Figure 2: Mode share of frequent users of bus and underground services, by age (2007/08 – 2009/10)

Source: Travel in London Supplementary Report: London Travel Demand Survey

Figure 3: Mode share of frequent car drivers and passengers, by age (2007/08 – 2009/10)

bar chart showing percentages
Figure 3: Mode share of frequent car drivers and passengers, by age (2007/08 – 2009/10)

Source: Travel in London Supplementary Report: London Travel Demand Survey

 

 Figure 4: Mode share of frequent cyclists and pedestrians, by age (2007/08 – 2009/10)

bar chart of percentages
Figure 4: Mode share of frequent cyclists and pedestrians, by age (2007/08 – 2009/10)

Source: Travel in London Supplementary Report: London Travel Demand Survey

London residents in the age bands 25-44 and 45-59 on average make the highest number of daily trips, at 2.8 trips per day. Those aged over 65 make the fewest trips on average, at 2.1 trips per day. 9

Older residents and children, who tend to take the fewest trips, are disproportionately the victims of road traffic accidents, and the outcomes of such accidents are more likely to be fatal in these groups. 10 A review of casualty data in Hackney found that the highest overall casualty rates between 2008 and 2012 were among males aged 20-24 years. 11

While the numbers are small, children and adolescents are also the groups at greatest risk of KSI specifically when cycling in London. However, the largest number of casualties occur among cyclists in the 25-39 age group, reflecting the high number of cyclists in this age group. 12

Air pollution disproportionately affects older adults and can affect the lung development of children, as well as exacerbating asthma. 13 14

 

References

  1. Transport for London, “Travel in London Supplementary Report: London Travel Demand Survey,” 2011.
  2. Transport for London, “LTDS Workbook 2014,” 2014. [Online]. Available: https://tfl.gov.uk/corporate/publications-and-reports/london-travel-demand-survey. [Accessed November 2016].
  3. Hackney Council, “Hackney Transport Strategy 2015-2025,” 2016.
  4. Hackney Council, “Hackney Transport Strategy 2015-2025: Road Safety Plan,” 2016.
  5. Transport for London, “Cycle Safety Action Plan: Working together towards roads free from death and serious injury,” 2014.
  6. London Climate Change Partnership, “Linking environment and health: A resource for policy and decision makers working on Joint Strategic Needs Assessment,” 2012.
  7. S. Vardoulakis, “Public health matters blog: Understanding the impact of particulate air pollution,” Public Health England, 3 November 2015. [Online]. Available: https://publichealthmatters.blog.gov.uk/2015/11/03/understanding-the-impact-of-particulate-air-pollution/. [Accessed November 2016].
  8. Transport for London, “Travel in London Supplementary Report: London Travel Demand Survey,” 2011.
  9. Transport for London, “LTDS Workbook 2014,” 2014. [Online]. Available: https://tfl.gov.uk/corporate/publications-and-reports/london-travel-demand-survey. [Accessed November 2016].
  10. Hackney Council, “Hackney Transport Strategy 2015-2025,” 2016.
  11. Hackney Council, “Hackney Transport Strategy 2015-2025: Road Safety Plan,” 2016.
  12. Transport for London, “Cycle Safety Action Plan: Working together towards roads free from death and serious injury,” 2014.
  13. London Climate Change Partnership, “Linking environment and health: A resource for policy and decision makers working on Joint Strategic Needs Assessment,” 2012.
  14. S. Vardoulakis, “Public health matters blog: Understanding the impact of particulate air pollution,” Public Health England, 3 November 2015. [Online]. Available: https://publichealthmatters.blog.gov.uk/2015/11/03/understanding-the-impact-of-particulate-air-pollution/. [Accessed November 2016].