Certain Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) groups are at higher risk of diet-related poor health.  For example, stroke and type 2 diabetes risk is higher in the Black African Caribbean community and South Asians are at higher risk of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome.B 5 6

In the UK (like the US), fast-food outlets tend to be concentrated in more deprived areas, which are often the most ethnically diverse. 7 In Hackney, this pattern is less clear due to a high density of fast-food outlets in most areas, with clustering in the night-time economy areas (see Figure 2).

In England, the What About YOUth survey found that young people from a BAME background were more likely to consume five or more portions of fruit and vegetables per day compared with young people from a White background (57% and 51% respectively), though young people from a Black background had a similarly low uptake (50%). 8

The 2015 Hackney health and wellbeing survey found that adult Asian respondents are more likely to eat home-cooked meals every day than average (68% vs. 49% overall), but that Mixed ethnicity residents are more likely to eat takeaway foods at least once a week (60%) than average (38% overall) and to eat ready meals at least once a week (46% vs. 25% overall).

Notes

  1. Metabolic syndrome is defined as a cluster of risk factors that include obesity, high blood pressure and diabetes
  2. Metabolic syndrome is defined as a cluster of risk factors that include obesity, high blood pressure and diabetes

References

  1. A. Misra and L. Khurana, “The metabolic syndrome in South Asians: epidemiology, determinants, and prevention,” Metabolic Syndrome related Disorder, vol. 7, no. 10.1089/met.2009.0024, pp. 497-514, 2009
  2. O. R. Molaodi, A. H. Leyland and A. Ellaway, “Neighbourhood food and physical activity environments in England, UK: does ethnic density matter?,” International Journal of Behavioural Nutrition and Physical Activity 2012, vol. 9, no. 75, 2012
  3. O. R. Molaodi, A. H. Leyland and A. Ellaway, “Neighbourhood food and physical activity environments in England, UK: does ethnic density matter?,” International Journal of Behavioural Nutrition and Physical Activity 2012, vol. 9, no. 75, 2012
  4. NHS Digital, “Health and Wellbeing of 15-year-olds in England – Main findings from the What About YOUth? Survey 2014,” 2014
  5. A. Misra and L. Khurana, “The metabolic syndrome in South Asians: epidemiology, determinants, and prevention,” Metabolic Syndrome related Disorder, vol. 7, no. 10.1089/met.2009.0024, pp. 497-514, 2009
  6. O. R. Molaodi, A. H. Leyland and A. Ellaway, “Neighbourhood food and physical activity environments in England, UK: does ethnic density matter?,” International Journal of Behavioural Nutrition and Physical Activity 2012, vol. 9, no. 75, 2012
  7. O. R. Molaodi, A. H. Leyland and A. Ellaway, “Neighbourhood food and physical activity environments in England, UK: does ethnic density matter?,” International Journal of Behavioural Nutrition and Physical Activity 2012, vol. 9, no. 75, 2012
  8. NHS Digital, “Health and Wellbeing of 15-year-olds in England – Main findings from the What About YOUth? Survey 2014,” 2014