Having a disability can affect how people purchase, prepare and eat food (for example, difficulty reading labels, transporting food or using cooking equipment). 4 5

A recent report from the US highlights that people with mental or physical disabilities are at greater risk of food insecurity. 6 Due to the difference in social support between the UK and US this finding is not directly comparable, however.

The 2015 Hackney health and wellbeing survey found that adult respondents with a self-reported disability were more likely to say that they eat ready meals at least once per week than average (35% vs. 24% overall).

 

References

  1. Faculty of Public Health, “Food Poverty and Health,” 2005
  2. The Caroline Walker Trust, “Eat Well for Children and Adults with learning disabilities,” 2004
  3. M. Meisenheimer, “SNAP Matters for People with Disabilities,” Food Research and Action Center., 2015.
  4. Faculty of Public Health, “Food Poverty and Health,” 2005
  5. The Caroline Walker Trust, “Eat Well for Children and Adults with learning disabilities,” 2004
  6. M. Meisenheimer, “SNAP Matters for People with Disabilities,” Food Research and Action Center., 2015.