The ‘Living standards’ section of this JSNA chapter describes levels of deprivation poverty in Hackney and the City of London.

Low and middle-income families spend proportionately more of their income on food than those on higher incomes, and this is linked to poor dietary choices. 4

It is not known how many residents in Hackney and the City are affected by the affordability of food.  Nationally, the number of foodbanks has ‘exploded’ over the past 10 years, but it has not been possible to confirm the number of people using foodbanks in Hackney or the City. 5

In 2012-13, one third (34%) of primary school children were eligible for and claiming free school meals in Hackney, double the national average and the sixth highest in London.  In the City, almost one quarter (22%) of primary school children were eligible for and claiming free school meals.  This is lower than the level in inner London and London as a whole, but just over 5% higher than the national average. 6

References

  1. R. Griffith, M. O. Connell and K. Smith, “Food expenditure and nutritional quality over the Great Recession,” Institute for Fiscal Studies, 2013
  2. A. Forsey, “An Evidence Review for the All Parliamentary Group on Hunger in the United Kingdom,” Archbishop of Canterbury’s Charitable Trust, 2014
  3. Department for Education., “Pupils eligible for free school meals,” 2014
  4. R. Griffith, M. O. Connell and K. Smith, “Food expenditure and nutritional quality over the Great Recession,” Institute for Fiscal Studies, 2013
  5. A. Forsey, “An Evidence Review for the All Parliamentary Group on Hunger in the United Kingdom,” Archbishop of Canterbury’s Charitable Trust, 2014
  6. Department for Education., “Pupils eligible for free school meals,” 2014