The Faculty of Public Health recommends that local authorities eliminate the barriers to healthy eating through: 3

  • providing help with money matters e.g. through a local authority anti-poverty unit and ensuring benefit entitlements are claimed
  • providing better housing conditions to tackle lack of cooking equipment or storage to enable bulk buying
  • improving access to affordable, good quality foods for those without cars, for example through improving public transport links and supporting shopping-carrying schemes, or community delivery schemes from retailers; this can be considered in the planning and regeneration of town centres and residential areas
  • improving nutrition through schools, for example by providing breakfast before school and offering healthier school meals.

For some residents (including disabled or housebound people), promotion of online grocery shopping can provide a convenient and cost-effective means of accessing a good quality diet, but this needs to be supported with digital literacy, help putting shopping away and minimising delivery costs. 4

References

  1. Faculty of Public Health, “Food Poverty and Health,” 2005
  2. Age UK, “Food shopping in later life,” 2012
  3. Faculty of Public Health, “Food Poverty and Health,” 2005
  4. Age UK, “Food shopping in later life,” 2012