The Licensing Enforcement Operational Group in Hackney and the City of London Licensing Liaison Partnership Group examine new licensing applications and existing licensed premises, with the aim of promoting the four licensing objectives which must be taken in to account when a local authority carries out its functions. These objectives are: 4

  • the prevention of crime and disorder
  • public safety
  • prevention of public nuisance
  • the protection of children from harm.

The Public Health Team in Hackney supports measures to reduce the affordability, availability and attractiveness of alcohol. Safe Sociable London Partnership was commissioned to support the implementation of a public health contribution to the licensing process for premises that sell alcohol. Public Health staff review licensing applications and, where appropriate, provide location-specific data to other agencies making responses to applications. Public Health contributed data, mapping and context to the review of the Statement of Licensing Policy, including proposing the inclusion of a licensing objective to promote and improve public health.

Hackney’s Public Health Team also input to licensing decisions using the ‘Bulls-eye’ tool (developed by the SafeStats team) to help identify levels of crime and number of licensed premises in a local area. 5  See Box 11 for detail.

Box 11: The Bullseye Dashboard

The Bullseye Dashboard was developed by the SafeStatsC team for the purposes of scanning for, and revealing, crime and disorder trends related potentially to alcohol licensing.  The centre of the bullseye represents incidents that occur within 100 meters of the postcode location and colour coding reveals whether the location has higher than average incident counts (e.g. the number of ambulance-recorded assaults in Hackney within a given timeframe).

Please note: There are important caveats with regard to data quality in using this tool, which is a scanning tool that reveals general trends. The data may not be an exact mirror of events in the real world. At best, it will be an approximation. The information can be used to identify areas for further analysis or focus, but it should not be relied upon for a definitive count of incidents at a specific time.

 

The ‘Alcohol’ section of the ‘Lifestyle and behaviour’ JSNA chapter also describes a pilot project in Hackney called ‘Nudging pubs’ which worked with pubs and bars to improve their offer to customers who drink less or not at all. 6  The pilot aimed to increase the availability and attractiveness of soft drinks and is now working in partnership with Blenheim CDP on the Club Soda GuideD that rewards pubs and bars for being ‘City and Hackney’s best places for mindful drinkers.’

Box 12 describes support from the City of London Police to support safety at night-time venues.

Box 12: City of London Police support to safety at night-time venues

The City of London Police licensing team has a long history of working in partnership with licensed premises in order to establish a profitable and safe environment for the night-time economy to thrive. As part of this collaboration, the partnership is keen to test new innovations that will seek to promote the licensing objectives and reduce the risk of any associated crime.

In the build up to the Christmas period 2015, the police purchased a number of breath testing devices designed for the specific purpose of being used within the night-time economy. The device is used as a tool to assist door staff at venues when making decisions about who to admit. If a patron is displaying signs of intoxication, a staff member can ask them to provide a specimen of breath into the device, which gives a reading in seconds with a red light indicating that the person is over twice the drink drive limit and a green light indicating they are under.

Since the introduction of these devices, the feedback from premises has been very positive. Many have commented how the device has helped to defuse tension at the door, as the device can clearly indicate that a person may have already consumed too much alcohol and the decision to refuse entry becomes less personal.

Notes

  1. https://www.london.gov.uk/what-we-do/research-and-analysis/people-and-communities/strategic-crime-analysis/crime-data-and  The Bullseye Dashboard is based on data including ambulance recorded assaults, head injuries, gun, knife and weapons injuries, least serious injuries, alcohol related incidents, bus driver reported ASB and violence and British Transport Police data.
  2. http://clubsodaguide.com/
  3. https://www.london.gov.uk/what-we-do/research-and-analysis/people-and-communities/strategic-crime-analysis/crime-data-and  The Bullseye Dashboard is based on data including ambulance recorded assaults, head injuries, gun, knife and weapons injuries, least serious injuries, alcohol related incidents, bus driver reported ASB and violence and British Transport Police data.
  4. http://clubsodaguide.com/

References

  1. Hackney Council, “Hackney Development Management Local Plan,” 2015
  2. Hackney Council, Licensing Committee, “Public Health and Licensing,” 2014
  3. L. Willoughby and J. Tolvi, “Nudging Pubs – Club Soda,” 2016
  4. Hackney Council, “Hackney Development Management Local Plan,” 2015
  5. Hackney Council, Licensing Committee, “Public Health and Licensing,” 2014
  6. L. Willoughby and J. Tolvi, “Nudging Pubs – Club Soda,” 2016