Fast food outlets tend to sell food that is high in fat and salt and drinks that are high in sugar. Increased use of fast-food outlets is associated with obesity and excess weight gain over timeAas well as an increased risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes as a result of insulin resistance. 1  There is also evidence that the type of food on sale near schools may influence the diet of school children. 2  

One study in Cambridgeshire found that people exposed to the highest numbers of takeaways are 80% more likely to be obese than those with the lowest exposure. 3  Given the high numbers of takeaways and high levels of child obesity in Hackney, addressing the role of the food environment in limiting or supporting local efforts to reduce obesity is an important area of focus locally.  For further information, see the Health Needs Assessment for 5-19 Year Old Residents of the London Borough of Hackney and the City of London. 4

Notes

  1. The most widely used method for assessing ‘excess’ weight is body mass index (BMI). BMI is a measure of whether someone is a healthy weight for their height.

References

  1. M. A. Pereira, A. I. Kartashov and C. B. Ebbeling, “Fast-food habits, weight gain, and insulin resistance (the CARDIA study): 15-year prospective analysis,” Lancet, no. DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(04)17663-0, 2005
  2. Local Government Association, “Tipping the scales. Case studies on the use of planning powers to limit fast food takeaways,” 2016
  3. T. Burgoine, N. G. Forouhi and S. J. Griffin, “Associations between exposure to takeaway food outlets, takeaway food consumption and body weight in Cambridgeshire, UK: population based cross sectional study.,” BMJ, no. doi: 10.1136/bmj.g1464, 2014
  4. Hackney Council, “A Health Needs Assessment for 5-19 Year Old Residents of the London Borough of Hackney and the City of London,” 2016