Deprivation

Figure 5 below illustrates patterns of deprivation in different parts of Hackney.  There are particular concentrations of deprivation:

  • in the eastern part of the borough around King’s Park and Hackney Wick
  • in the north-west of the borough, around Manor House and Woodberry Down
  • on the borders between Victoria and Homerton wards
  • on the borders between Springfield and Lea Bridge wards.

For more information, please see Hackney Council’s ‘Indices of Multiple Deprivation 2015 Briefing’ report2

Figure 5: Deprivation in Hackney (IMD2015), by neighbourhood (ward and LSOA, 2015)

Figure 5: Deprivation in Hackney (IMD2015), by neighbourhood (ward and LSOA, 2015)

Source: Indices of Deprivation, Department for Communities and Local Government, Crown Copyright, 2015

Figure 6 illustrates patterns of deprivation across the City of London (using a slightly different measure than that presented for Hackney wards above).  There are clear differences between the more deprived areas of Mansell Street and Petticoat Lane in the east and the wealthier Barbican Estate in the north-west.  No City of London neighbourhood is considered to be in the 20% most deprived in England.

Figure 6: Deprivation in the City of London (rank of IMD2015 quintile), by neighbourhood (LSOA, 2015)

Figure 6: Deprivation in the City of London (rank of IMD2015 quintile), by neighbourhood (LSOA, 2015)

Source: IMD2015, Department of Communities and Local Government, Crown Copyright, 2015

Child poverty

Figure 7 shows the highest levels of child poverty to be in the south and east of Hackney, with significant poverty also in areas in the centre and north west of the borough. Woodberry Down, Haggerston, and Hoxton West are home to multiple neighbourhoods where over half of the under-20 population live in families in poverty.

Figure 7: Map illustrating the geography of children living in poverty in Hackney and the City (2011)

Figure 7: Map illustrating the geography of children living in poverty in Hackney and the City (2011) Source: HMRC

Source: HMRC

In the City of London, child poverty in Portsoken is significantly higher than the City and London regional averages.  On one estimate (unpublished), as many as two-thirds of children living in this area are living in low-income households.

Welfare benefits

Figure 8 shows that there is a particularly high concentration of out-of-work benefit claimants towards the east of Hackney, especially in Homerton, Hackney Wick and Woodberry Down.  Portsoken has the highest rate of benefit claimants in the City.  In the south of Hackney and across most of the City, rates of out-of-work benefit claimants are much lower.

Figure 8: Hackney residents claiming out-of-work benefits per 1,000 population (aged 16-64, 2015)

Figure 8: Hackney residents claiming out-of-work benefits per 1,000 population (aged 16-64, 2015)

Source: Benefits data: Census output area data on workless benefit claimants, 2015. Population count: ONS Census, 2011

Note: The dataset refers to numbers of benefit claimants for the four ‘out-of-work’ benefit categories – Jobseeker’s Allowance, Incapacity Benefit/Employment Support Allowance, Income Support (e.g. lone parents) and ‘Other income-related benefits’.

References

  1. London Borough of Hackney, “Indices of Multiple Deprivation 2015 Briefing,” 2015
  2. London Borough of Hackney, “Indices of Multiple Deprivation 2015 Briefing,” 2015