A recent review of gender and poverty found that women in the UK are slightly more likely than men to be living in low income households. 4

While there is limited evidence on the gender patterning of poverty and social deprivation, gender roles within the family and features of the labour market and benefits system all combine and interact with gender to influence routes into and out of poverty. 5  For example, lone parents (who are often female) are at increased risk of poverty (see Local inequalities by household type).

Links between gender and poverty may also be apparent if family income is not shared fairly by couples (hidden poverty) or if one partner’s financial dependence on the other incurs a risk of future poverty. 6

References

  1. F. Bennett, snd M. Daly, for the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, “Poverty through a Gender Lens: Evidence and Policy Review on Gender and Poverty,” Department of Social Policy and Intervention, University of Oxford, 2014.
  2. Joseph Rowntree Foundation, “Reducing Poverty in the UK: a collection of evidence reviews,” 2014.
  3. F. Bennett, snd M. Daly, for the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, “Poverty through a Gender Lens: Evidence and Policy Review on Gender and Poverty,” Department of Social Policy and Intervention, University of Oxford, 2014.
  4. F. Bennett, snd M. Daly, for the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, “Poverty through a Gender Lens: Evidence and Policy Review on Gender and Poverty,” Department of Social Policy and Intervention, University of Oxford, 2014.
  5. Joseph Rowntree Foundation, “Reducing Poverty in the UK: a collection of evidence reviews,” 2014.
  6. F. Bennett, snd M. Daly, for the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, “Poverty through a Gender Lens: Evidence and Policy Review on Gender and Poverty,” Department of Social Policy and Intervention, University of Oxford, 2014.