Disability is strongly linked to deprivation, due to lower employment income and higher risk of benefit dependency among disabled residents.  In Hackney, nearly a quarter of households with a disabled family member also include dependent children.  Childhood disability often leads to additional living costs, increased risk of family breakdown and poverty.

People with mental or learning disabilities have been particularly affected by the benefit cap implemented as part of the current government’s welfare reforms.  An inquiry into the impact of Universal Credit on disabled people and their families found that approximately 450,000 disabled people in the UK could lose out once it is fully implemented.  Vulnerable groups who would be financially worse off under the new system were found to be disabled children, severely disabled people who do not have another adult to assist them and disabled people who work. 2

In addition, people with disabilities or long-term health conditions are likely to be affected by specific reforms to the benefits they may be eligible for – specifically DLA and ESA.

References

  1. The Children’s Society, “Holes in the safety net: The impact of Universal Credit on disabled people and their families,” 2012
  2. The Children’s Society, “Holes in the safety net: The impact of Universal Credit on disabled people and their families,” 2012