Poverty is a driver of poor health and wellbeing outcomes for children, independent of other factors that correlate with household income. 4  Factors associated with low income – such as poor housing, as well as parental unemployment, debt and mental health issues – compound the impact of poverty on child health. 5

Children living in low-income households are more likely than other children to: 6

  • die in the first year of life
  • have pre-school conduct and behavioural problems
  • experience bullying and take part in risky behaviours (such as smoking) as teenagers
  • do less well at school
  • grow up to have low incomes in adulthood, with associated and cumulative health and wellbeing impacts.

References

  1. Joseph Rowntree Foundation, “Does money affect children’s outcomes?,” 2013. [Online]. Available: https://www.jrf.org.uk/report/does-money-affect-children%E2%80%99s-outcomes. [Accessed September 2016]
  2. The Children’s Society, “A good childhood for every child? Child Poverty and social inequality in the UK 2012,” 2012. [Online]. Available: http://www.childrenssociety.org.uk/sites/default/files/tcs/2013_child_poverty_briefing_1.pdf (PDF document). [Accessed September 2016]
  3. City and Hackney JSNA, “City and Hackney Health and Wellbeing Profile 2011/12,” 2011/12, pp. 193-235
  4. Joseph Rowntree Foundation, “Does money affect children’s outcomes?,” 2013. [Online]. Available: https://www.jrf.org.uk/report/does-money-affect-children%E2%80%99s-outcomes. [Accessed September 2016]
  5. The Children’s Society, “A good childhood for every child? Child Poverty and social inequality in the UK 2012,” 2012. [Online]. Available: http://www.childrenssociety.org.uk/sites/default/files/tcs/2013_child_poverty_briefing_1.pdf (PDF document). [Accessed September 2016]
  6. City and Hackney JSNA, “City and Hackney Health and Wellbeing Profile 2011/12,” 2011/12, pp. 193-235