By 2020/21, Hackney residents are expected to have experienced the fourth biggest loss of income in London as a result of recent welfare and housing reforms – an average loss of £410 per adult per year.  Barking and Dagenham, Newham and Enfield, are the only London boroughs with larger expected reductions. 2

Figure 12 shows that Hackney has the highest rate of people claiming out-of-work benefits compared to England, London and all of its statistical peers.  The City has comparatively low rates of benefit claimants on this measure.

Figure 12: Total number of residents claiming out-of-work benefits per 1,000 working age population (age 18-64, 2015)

Hackney has the highest rate of people claiming out-of-work benefits
Figure 12: Total number of residents claiming out-of-work benefits per 1,000 working age population (age 18-64, 2015)

Source: Greater London Authority (GLA) Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment (SHLAA) capped household estimates 2015

Note: Out-of-work benefits include JSA, Incapacity Benefit/ESA, Income Support

Figure 13 shows how claimant rates have decreased slightly for these benefits over the past nine years.  The City of London has a consistently lower rate of out-of-work benefit claimants than the local and national figures.

Figure 13: Total number of benefit claimants per 1,000 working age population (age 18-64, 2015)

Figure 13: Total number of benefit claimants per 1,000 working age population (age 18-64, 2015)

Source: GLA SHLAA capped household estimates 2015

Note: Out-of-work benefits include JSA, Incapacity Benefit/ESA, Income Support

References

  1. C. Beatty and S. Fothergill, “The uneven impact of welfare reform – The financial losses to places and people,” Sheffield Hallam University Centre for Regional Economic and Social Research, 2016
  2. C. Beatty and S. Fothergill, “The uneven impact of welfare reform – The financial losses to places and people,” Sheffield Hallam University Centre for Regional Economic and Social Research, 2016