The 2014 Hackney housing needs survey highlighted that problems with the home across all tenures are mainly associated with cold, mould and damp (Figure 2) – all major causes of housing-associated ill-health (see Section 6.3.1). 5 Housing-related problems were found to be much less common in the owner-occupied sector than in other tenures.

Figure 2: Housing problems in Hackney (all tenures)

Figure 2: Housing problems in Hackney (all tenures)

Source: Hackney housing needs survey 2014

The condition of social housing in Hackney has significantly improved since the Decent Homes Standard was first introduced in 2003, with well over 90% of council and housing association homes now meeting the criteria. 6  The position regarding private rented housing is less clear, since no study of conditions has been carried out since 2009 – this estimated that only 69% of private sector homes in Hackney met the Decent Homes Standard. 7

A separate estimate suggests that around 10,000 privately rented properties in Hackney have at least one HHSRS category 1 hazard (based on data from the 2010 English Housing Survey applied to the estimated total number of privately rented properties in Hackney).

In a recent survey of private tenants in Hackney, most respondents (76%) considered that the properties they lived in were in a ‘fair’ condition or better. 8 However, nearly a quarter of respondents (24%) rated the condition of their properties as ‘poor’ or ‘very poor’. Private renters were also asked if they experienced any issues with their current accommodation. A large majority (72%) indicated that they experienced some issues, with repairs being a significant problem – almost half of respondents (47%) agreed that their accommodation was in a poor state of repair and two thirds (66%) were of the view that repairs were not undertaken when needed.

The City of London Corporation met its Decent Homes target by 2010, with the exception of one tower block.  The Standard will be achieved across all council stock by the end of 2016.

Table 2 shows levels of overcrowding in Hackney and the City based on the bedroom standard (see Box 1) using data from the 2011 Census. An occupancy rating of -1 or less indicates that a household has at least one bedroom too few for the number and composition of people living in the household – this is defined as overcrowding using the bedroom standard.  On this measure, Hackney has the fifth highest rate of overcrowding in England and the City is ranked 43 (out of 437 areas).

Table 2: Overcrowding levels in Hackney, City of London, London and England (2011) totals and percentages of total

  Hackney City of London London England
Households

 

101,690 4,385 3,266,173 22,063,368
Occupancy rating of – 1 12,882 (12.7%) 221 (5.0%) 301,325 (9.2%) 870,540 (3.9%)
Occupancy rating of – 2 or less 2,625 (2.6%) 37 (0.8%) 69,206 (2.1%) 153,933 (0.7%)

Source: ONS, Census

Note: an occupancy rating of -1 indicates that a household has one bedroom too few for the number and composition of people living in the household. An occupancy rating of -2 indicates that a household has at least two bedrooms too few.

References

  1. Opinion Research Services, “London Borough of Hackney: Strategic Housing Market Assessment 2014,” March 2015.
  2. Department for Communities and Local Government, “A Decent Home: Definition and guidance for implementation,” June 2006.
  3. Fordham research, “London Borough of Hackney Housing Needs Assessment,” 2009.
  4. Housing Quality Network (HQN), “The private rented sector in Hackney: stakeholder engagement and listening exercise,” 2015.
  5. Opinion Research Services, “London Borough of Hackney: Strategic Housing Market Assessment 2014,” March 2015.
  6. Department for Communities and Local Government, “A Decent Home: Definition and guidance for implementation,” June 2006.
  7. Fordham research, “London Borough of Hackney Housing Needs Assessment,” 2009.
  8. Housing Quality Network (HQN), “The private rented sector in Hackney: stakeholder engagement and listening exercise,” 2015.