Many housing-related health harms are particularly damaging for the youngest and oldest age groups. For example: 4 5

  • vulnerable older people and young children are at particular risk of harm from cold homes
  • children are more likely to live in overcrowded housing compared with working age adults and pensioners – with lasting impacts on their social, mental and physical development
  • older people are at increased risk of falls, including those caused by housing-related hazards.

The section on the Health and Wellbeing Impacts of Affordability and Availability described how the impact of rising housing costs is being felt disproportionately by young single people (among others).

While social housing is the largest single tenure in Hackney (see Local Data on Tenure section), Figure 5 shows that couples with no children are much more likely to be owner-occupiers, while private renting is the most common tenure among ‘other’ households with no dependent children (which includes groups of younger adults living together, e.g. in HMOs). However, nearly one fifth (19%) of private renters in Hackney are households with dependent children. 6

According to the 2014 Hackney housing needs survey, among low income households (for this purpose, annual household income of less than £20,000), it is couples with children who are most likely to be living in the private rented sector, which may be exposing them to poor housing conditions and therefore exacerbating health inequalities.

Figure 5: Household composition in Hackney, by tenure (2014)

Figure 5: Household composition in Hackney, by tenure (2014)

Source: Hackney housing needs survey 2014

Note: ‘Owned’ in this context includes properties owned with a mortgage and those owned outright.

In 2015/16, the CHAIN data suggests that most rough sleepers in Hackney and the City of London were aged between 26 and 55, though it does appear that the local rough sleeping population is getting younger. This age profile was similar to that of London as whole, with most rough sleepers being aged 26 – 45 years, around one in ten under 26 years old and one in ten over 55.

References

  1. NatCen Social Research, “People living in bad housing– numbers and health impacts,” August 2013.
  2. World Health Organization, “What are the main risk factors for falls among older people and what are the most effective interventions to prevent these falls?,” March 2004.
  3. Office of National Statistics, “Tenure by household composition,” 2011. [Online]. Available: https://www.nomisweb.co.uk/census/2011/dc4101ew. [Accessed November 2016].
  4. NatCen Social Research, “People living in bad housing– numbers and health impacts,” August 2013.
  5. World Health Organization, “What are the main risk factors for falls among older people and what are the most effective interventions to prevent these falls?,” March 2004.
  6. Office of National Statistics, “Tenure by household composition,” 2011. [Online]. Available: https://www.nomisweb.co.uk/census/2011/dc4101ew. [Accessed November 2016].