Table 1 shows that almost 50,000 pupils are attending registered schools in Hackney, with a significant proportion attending independent schools. See Box 2 for descriptions of the different types of schools in England.

Table 1: Types of schools in Hackney and pupil numbers (2016)

Type of provision Pupil numbers
Maintained nursery 195
Maintained primary 19,429
Maintained secondary 5,628
Special 330
Pupil Referral Unit (PRU) 84
Independent 9,104
Academies & free schools – primary 1,372
Academies & free schools – secondary 7,230
Total 43,372

Source: Schools pupils and their characteristics (Department for Education, January 2016)

Many of the Independent schools in Hackney are Charedi schools which are almost entirely funded by the parents and from the wider Charedi community. All children attend school from the age of three until full time adult further (religious) education. The sexes are segregated from the start of schooling and most of the teaching is conducted in Yiddish. 6 Much of the school day is dedicated to religious learning especially in boys’ schools, whereas more mainstream subjects are taught to girls.

These independent schools can be costly for families due to school fees and the fact that pupils are not eligible for school-based means-tested benefits (including uniform grants and free school meals). 7

There a number of unregistered Charedi schools in the borough which means that they operate outside the supervision of the Department for Education (DfE), local authorities or Ofsted inspections. Unregistered schools are illegal and may offer an insufficiently broad education to pupils. There are also risks associated with attending children not being known to the local authority.

Box 2: Descriptions of different types of schools 8

Academies – run by the academy trust and independent of the LA and can follow a different curriculum.

City technology colleges – a type of secondary school set up and funded through partnerships between the government and business with emphasis on teaching technological, science and practical skills in inner-city areas.

Community schools – controlled by the local council and not influenced by business or religious groups.

Faith schools – faith schools can be different kinds of schools, e.g. voluntary aided schools or academies, but are associated with a particular religion. Faith schools are mostly run like other state schools and have to follow the national curriculum except for religious studies, where they are free to only teach about their own religion.

Free schools – funded by the government and run by a trust, independent of the local authority and have more control over how they operate. They are ‘all ability schools’ so can’t use academic selection processes like grammar schools. They can set their own pay and conditions for staff, change the length of school terms and the school day. They don’t have to follow the national curriculum.

Grammar schools – run by the council, a foundation body or a trust, they select all or most of their pupils based on academic ability. There is often an exam to get in.

Foundation schools – have more freedom to change the way they do things than community schools.

Pupil referral unit (PRU) – a school maintained by a local authority which is specifically organised to provide education for children who are excluded, sick, or otherwise unable to attend a mainstream or special maintained school.

Private schools – also known as ‘independent schools’, charge fees to attend instead of being funded by the government. Pupils don’t have to follow the national curriculum. Private schools must be registered with the government and are inspected regularly.

Special schools – offer educational provision for children and young people aged two or over, which is additional to, or otherwise different from, the educational provision made generally for children of their age in schools maintained by the local authority. The school can specialise in one of the four areas of special educational needs; communication and interaction, cognition and learning, social, emotional and mental health, or sensory and physical needs. To attend a special school, a child or young person would ordinarily require a Statement of SEN or EHCP naming the specific school.

State boarding schools – state boarding schools provide free education but charge fees for boarding; some are run by local councils and some are run as academies or free schools. State boarding schools give priority to children who have a particular need for boarding.

Voluntary-aided (VA) schools – maintained schools that often, but not always, have a religious character

Figure 1 provides definitions of key qualifications across the life course and a snapshot of the level of attainment by Hackney residents in 2014/15, including NEET figures for 16-18 year olds. A more in-depth analysis over time and comparisons with other areas can be found in Section 5.5.9 The data looked at in this section are from 2014/15. Provisional data are available for 2015/16, and this section will be updated with new analysis in due course, as part of the JSNA rolling update programme. The latest data suggest current trends as reported here are continuing.

Figure 1: Attainment by educational level and NEET in Hackney (2014/15) 10

Figure 1: Attainment by educational level and NEET in Hackney (2014/15) [10]

References

  1. J. Spitzer, A guide to the Orthodox Jewish Way of Life for Healthcare Professionals, 1998.
  2. Interlink Foundation, “Torah, worship and acts of loving kindness: baseline indicators for the charedi community in Stamford Hill,” 2002.
  3. Department for Education, “Types of schools,” [Online]. Available: https://www.gov.uk/types-of-school/overview. [Accessed June 2016].
  4. Public Health England, “The link between health and wellbeing and attainment. A briefing for head teachers, governors,” 2014.
  5. Department for Education, “What qualifications mean,” [Online]. Available: https://www.gov.uk/what-different-qualification-levels-mean/compare-different-qualification-levels. [Accessed June 2016].
  6. J. Spitzer, A guide to the Orthodox Jewish Way of Life for Healthcare Professionals, 1998.
  7. Interlink Foundation, “Torah, worship and acts of loving kindness: baseline indicators for the charedi community in Stamford Hill,” 2002.
  8. Department for Education, “Types of schools,” [Online]. Available: https://www.gov.uk/types-of-school/overview. [Accessed June 2016].
  9. Public Health England, “The link between health and wellbeing and attainment. A briefing for head teachers, governors,” 2014.
  10. Department for Education, “What qualifications mean,” [Online]. Available: https://www.gov.uk/what-different-qualification-levels-mean/compare-different-qualification-levels. [Accessed June 2016].