Children with SEND may require support to reach their potential. Some children and young people with SEND may also be subject to other factors such as lower educational outcomes, social deprivation and poverty. In 2011, The Children’s Society reported that 40% of disabled children were living in poverty, compared to a national average of 30%. Furthermore, 14% of disabled children were living in severe income poverty (where household income is less than 40% of the median income), in comparison with 11% of all children. 2

Local authorities have a statutory duty to identify all children and young people in its area who have or may have SEND (aged 0-25), and ensure the integration of education health, and care provision where this will promote the wellbeing of these children and young people and improve the quality of special education provision.

In 2014/15 in Hackney, there was significant inequality in attainment levels between pupils who have no identified (Special Educational Needs) SEN and those who receive SEN support or have a SEN statement or EHCP, across all age ranges (Figure 9).

Figure 9: Educational attainment levels and qualifications I Hackney over the life course, by Special Educational Needs (2014/15)

Major inequality with SEN pupils achieving fewr qualifications at all ages/stages
Figure 9: Educational attainment levels and qualifications I Hackney over the life course, by Special Educational Needs (2014/15)  Source: Department for Education

References

  1. The Children’s Society, “4 in every 10: disabled children living in poverty,” 2011
  2. The Children’s Society, “4 in every 10: disabled children living in poverty,” 2011