Figure 7 shows that the relatively higher levels of early years development in pupils whose first language is English does not appear to continue to Key Stage 2 and at GCSE (A level qualifications are not broken down by first language spoken). Please note that if pupils and adults do not speak English as their main language, this does not mean that they are not fluent English speakers.

In the adult population, the gap widens significantly between the most qualified and least qualified groups in the borough according to main language spoken. Almost half of adults whose main language is English have some form of higher education qualification, compared to under a third whose main language is not English.

Figure 7: Educational attainment levels and qualifications in Hackney over the life course, by main language spoken (2014/15)

Inequalities seen in early years and adults - ESOL speakers achieve fewer qualifications
Figure 7: Educational attainment levels and qualifications in Hackney over the life course, by main language spoken (2014/15)

Source: Department for Education (school qualifications), ONS Census 2011 (adult qualifications).

Note: Adult education data are from 2011

Figure 8 shows that in the City of London in 2011, 74% of residents whose main language is English had level 4 qualifications or above, compared to 60% of residents whose first language is not English. 6% of City residents whose main language is English had no qualifications compared to 9% of residents whose first language is not English.

Figure 8: Percentage of adults in the City of London with no qualifications and at least level 4 qualifications, by first language spoken (2011)

When English is main language, fourteen percent more likely to have level 4 or above qualification.
Figure 8: Percentage of adults in the City of London with no qualifications and at least level 4 qualifications, by first language spoken (2011)

Source: ONS Census