Figure 4 shows that inequality in attainment by ethnicity increases across the life course in Hackney residents. In the Early Years, there are no real differences between different ethnic groups, but in Key Stage 2 and at GCSE Asian pupils do significantly better than average. In adulthood ethnic disparities are most marked, with over half of White residents having a level 4 qualification or above, compared to just over a quarter of Black residents.

Adults of Other ethnic origin were least likely to have level 4 qualifications and above, and most likely to have no qualifications, in the 2011 Census (Figure 5).

Figure 4: Educational attainment levels and qualifications in Hackney over the life, by ethnicity (2014/15)

Asian children do better than White or mixed race children, Black do worse
Figure 4: Educational attainment levels and qualifications in Hackney over the life, by ethnicity (2014/15)

Sources: Department for Education (school qualifications), ONS Census 2011 (adult qualifications).

Note: Adult education data are from 2011

Figure 5: Percentage of adults in Hackney with no qualifications and at least level 4 qualifications, by ethnicity (2011)

Figure 5: Percentage of adults in Hackney with no qualifications and at least level 4 qualifications, by ethnicity (2011)

Source: ONS Census

In the City of London in 2011, 59% of BAME residents had level 4 qualifications or above, compared to 76% of White residents (Figure 6). 9% of BAME residents had no qualifications compared to 6% of White residents.

Figure 6: Percentage of adults in the City with no qualifications and at least level 4 qualifications, by ethnicity (2011) D

Figure 6: Percentage of adults in the City with no qualifications and at least level 4 qualifications, by ethnicity (2011)

Source: ONS Census

Orthodox Jewish community

 Academic attainment for Orthodox Jewish pupils is not captured in the above mainstream results as almost all 16,700 children within Hackney’s Orthodox Jewish community attend local independent Charedi educational settings in Hackney. There are a number of Charedi educational settings which have voluntary aided status and are maintained by the local educational authority.E

Mostly, children are educated in single-sex independent schools, followed by yeshiva for young men and seminary for young women.F While Charedi girls tend to achieve formal state qualification results above the national average, boys receive far fewer formal qualifications. In a survey of adults, 35% of Charedi women had five GCSEs at grades A*-C, compared with only 11% of Charedi men. 3 This is likely because boys receive most tuition in Yiddish rather than English and study strongly focuses on religious subjects with an avoidance of secular subjects. 4

Gypsy, Roma, and Traveller communities

 There are around 600-800 Gypsies and Travellers living in Hackney, and the Hackney Traveller Education Service estimates that approximately 300 of these are children. The Gypsy, Roma and Traveller population has a long history of social exclusion, marginalisation and discrimination, and despite legal protection under equality legislation they remain one of the most socially excluded groups in the country. In England in 2003, less than 25% of Gypsy and Traveller children obtained 5 GCSEs or more at A*-C grades, compared to a national average of over 50%.

 

Notes

  1. Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) have been grouped as the individual sample sizes for each group were too small to be reported.
  2. Lubavitch Boys Primary School, Lubavitch Ruth Luzner Girls’ Primary School, Lubavtich Senior Girls’ School, and Yesodey Hatorah Secondary School for Girls.
  3. A yeshiva is an Orthodox Jewish College for boys or young men focused on the study of religious texts. The equivalent for girls or young women is a midrasha, translated as ‘seminary’.
  4. Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) have been grouped as the individual sample sizes for each group were too small to be reported.
  5. Lubavitch Boys Primary School, Lubavitch Ruth Luzner Girls’ Primary School, Lubavtich Senior Girls’ School, and Yesodey Hatorah Secondary School for Girls.
  6. A yeshiva is an Orthodox Jewish College for boys or young men focused on the study of religious texts. The equivalent for girls or young women is a midrasha, translated as ‘seminary’.

References

  1. Interlink Foundation, “Torah, worship and acts of loving kindness: baseline indicators for the charedi community in Stamford Hill,” 2002.
  2. K. Coleman-Brueckhemier and S. K. Dein, “Health Care Behaviours and Beliefs in Hasidic Jewish Populations: A Systematic Review of the Literature,” Journal of Religion and Health, vol. 50, pp. 422-436, 2011.
  3. Interlink Foundation, “Torah, worship and acts of loving kindness: baseline indicators for the charedi community in Stamford Hill,” 2002.
  4. K. Coleman-Brueckhemier and S. K. Dein, “Health Care Behaviours and Beliefs in Hasidic Jewish Populations: A Systematic Review of the Literature,” Journal of Religion and Health, vol. 50, pp. 422-436, 2011.