Research suggests that people with disabilities are at a higher risk of being victims of violence than non-disabled people, with the risk increasing for people with mental health illnesses. 3 4

Table 4 shows that, based on data from the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW), a higher proportion of women than men worry about violent crime (16% compared to 7% of men).

Table 4 also reveals that Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) groups are more likely to worry about violent crime and becoming a victim of crime compared to White British people. In addition, BAME groups are more likely to be actual victims of crime.

Table 4: Percentage of people who worry about violent crime, believe that they will be a victim of crime in the next 12 months and who have been a victim of crime (year ending March 2016)

Ethnic group % worry about violent crime % perceived likelihood of being a victim of crime % victim of crime
White (total) (9%) (18%) (14.7%)
·         English/Welsh/Scottish/Northern Irish/British 9% 18% 14.6%
·         Irish 11% 20% 17.3%
·         Gypsy, Traveller or Irish Traveller
·         Any other White background 17% 21% 16.4%
Mixed/Multiple (total) (8%) (21%) (21.4%)
·         White and Black Caribbean 18% 20.5%
·         White and Black African
·         White and Asian 21% 16.1%
·         Any other Mixed background 26% 25.9%
Asian/Asian British (total) (28%) (27%) (18.2%)
·         Indian 32% 27% 17.7%
·         Pakistani 24% 30% 22.5%
·         Bangladeshi 31% 15.2%
·         Chinese 16% 16.4%
·         Any other Asian background 32% 26% 15.3%
Black/Black British (total) (30%) (26%) (18.6%)
·         African 33% 25% 18.5%
·         Caribbean 21% 28% 15.8%
·         Any other Black/Black British background 28% 30.9%
Other ethnic group (total) (24%) (27%) (17%)
·         Arab 30% 10%
·         Any other ethnic group 25% 21.2%

Source: Crime Survey for England and Wales

Notes: “-“ indicates that data are not reported because the unweighted base is fewer than 50

References

  1. K. Hughes, M. Bellis and L. Jones, “Prevalence and risk of violence against adults with disability: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies,” The Lancet, vol. 379, no. 9826, pp. 1621-1629, 2012
  2. H. Khalifeh, L. Howard and D. Osborn, “Violence against people with disability in England and Wales: findings from a national cross-sectional survey,” PLoS ONE, vol. 8, no. 2, 2013
  3. K. Hughes, M. Bellis and L. Jones, “Prevalence and risk of violence against adults with disability: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies,” The Lancet, vol. 379, no. 9826, pp. 1621-1629, 2012
  4. H. Khalifeh, L. Howard and D. Osborn, “Violence against people with disability in England and Wales: findings from a national cross-sectional survey,” PLoS ONE, vol. 8, no. 2, 2013