In general, smoking prevalence rates in men are higher than in women, but this varies considerably by ethnic group. For this reason, ethnicity and gender are considered here together, as considering either one without the other may mask important areas of need.

Figure 1 shows smoking prevalence across gender and ethnicity for the City. Due to small numbers, residents have been amalgamated into broad ethnic groups. Caution should therefore be taken when generalising from these results, as we know from Hackney’s data that there can be very different smoking behaviours in different ethnic subgroups.

Key findings from Figure 1 are summarised below.

  • White British men and women have similar prevalence rates to their respective local authority averages. Smoking prevalence among men is about one and a half times that of women.
  • Other White men and women are roughly equally likely to smoke, but the prevalence rate among women is higher than the average for the City (among men it is similar to the local authority average).
  • While there is a lot of statistical uncertainty around Black and Asian smoking prevalence rates due to the small numbers involved, we can still see that Black and Asian men are more likely to smoke than Black and Asian women. As in Hackney, it is important to note that tobacco-related harm may be under-estimated in some communities by focusing on cigarette smoking.1
  • Due to small numbers, not much can be concluded about smoking prevalence in Mixed and Other ethnic groups in the City.

Figure 2 shows that the greatest number of GP recorded smokers in the City are White British (around 250 people – roughly 90 women and 160 men).  Other White residents make up the next largest group in absolute numbers (around 130 smokers – similar numbers of women and men).

As the majority of users of City SSS are not City residents, we do not have a comparable population of smokers against which to estimate rates of SSS use. However, data from 2015/16 show that just over twice as many men (142) as women (68) used City SSS, with the vast majority of users being White British (61% of women and 73% of men). Again, this is likely to reflect heavy SSS use among the daytime City worker population.

Figure 1: Proportion of adult City residents recorded as smokers by their GP, by ethnicity and gender (age 16+, 2016)

Source: GP data extracted from the GP register by CEG, Blizard Institute, April 2016.

Notes: Data covers City residents registered with a GP in Hackney, the City of London, Tower Hamlets and Newham.

Figure 2: Number of adult City residents recorded as smokers by their GP, by ethnicity and gender (age 16+, 2016)

Source: GP data extracted from the GP register by CEG, Blizard Institute, April 2016.

Notes: Data covers City residents registered with a GP in Hackney, the City of London, Tower Hamlets and Newham.

References

  1. NICE, “Smokeless tobacco: South Asian communities (PH39),” 2012.