Figure 1 shows that Hackney’s smoking attributable mortality rate is higher than London and England, but similar to most of its statistical peers. It is important to note that there is a time lag between smoking behaviour and smoking attributable mortality, and so what we are seeing here largely reflects the effects of smoking from over 20 years ago in the local population. 2

Figure 2 shows that nationally and regionally smoking attributable mortality has fallen over the period 2007-09 to 2012-14. Due to small numbers, it is not possible to say whether the trend has also been a downward one locally. What we can say is that smoking attributable mortality has been consistently higher in Hackney than London and England in recent years.

No comparable data are available for the City.

Figure 1: Deaths attributable to smoking per 100,000 population (age 35+, 2012-14)

Source: Data from ONS, analysis by Public Health England

Notes: Value not available for City of London

Figure 2: Deaths attributable to smoking per 100,000 population (age 35+, 2007-09 to 2012-14)

Source: Data from ONS, analysis by Public Health England

Notes: Value not available for City of London

References

  1. I. Funatogawa, T. Funatogawa and E. Yano, “Trends in smoking and lung cancer mortality in Japan, by birth cohort, 1949–2010,” Bulletin of the World Health Organization, vol. 91, pp. 332-340, 2013.
  2. I. Funatogawa, T. Funatogawa and E. Yano, “Trends in smoking and lung cancer mortality in Japan, by birth cohort, 1949–2010,” Bulletin of the World Health Organization, vol. 91, pp. 332-340, 2013.