Adult residents appear to be more likely to meet CMO (Chief Medical Officer) guidelines on physical activity than children, according to survey data.  Based on findings from the 2015 Active People Survey (a national survey commissioned by Sport England), 54% of adults in Hackney and 46% in the City were doing 150 minute or more of moderate exercise per week.  Conversely, 29% were classified as ‘inactive’ (i.e. do less than 30 minutes a week) in Hackney and 21% in the City. 6

In the Hackney resident health and wellbeing survey, a much higher proportion of adults (73%) reported doing sufficient physical activity to meet recommended levels – at least 150 minutes of moderate exercise per week (Figure 6). 7

Figure 6: Self-reported weekly physical activity levels among Hackney adults compared to national physical activity guidelines (age 16+, 2015)

Seventy-three percent of adults report themselves as 'active'
Figure 6: Self-reported weekly physical activity levels among Hackney adults compared to national physical activity guidelines (age 16+, 2015)

Source: Hackney resident health and wellbeing survey (2015).

Notes: Levels of physical activity reported from this source are much higher than Active People survey estimates reported elsewhere in this section.

A minority of respondents to the Hackney resident health and wellbeing survey (11%) felt they did not do enough exercise at the moment and didn’t want, or were unable, to do any more than their current amount. This group is older, less affluent, and more likely to include people with disabilities (all groups highly represented among most inactive residents, as outlined in section 1.4). 8

Residents who are physically active generally reported greater wellbeing on average. For example, those who meet the minimum activity thresholds are more likely than the most inactive residents to feel close to other people (91% compared to 83% report feeling close to others either ‘all of the time’, ‘often’ or ‘some of the time’).  From these data, it is not possible to draw any conclusions about direction of causation, however (i.e. whether physical activity leads to positive wellbeing, or vice versa).

Residents were also asked what specific type of activity they took part in during an average week (they could name multiple activities that were enough to raise their breathing rate) – the most common activity is walking (Table 2). Other popular activities include running and recreational cycling. A third of adults specifically take part in some form of sport (such as badminton, football or swimming).

Walking is also the most common activity among those survey respondents who are generally less active (including residents who are disabled, older, or feel they do not exercise enough) – more vigorous forms of activity tend to be done by more active groups. 9

Table 2: Types of physical activity reported by Hackney adults (age 16+, 2015)

Activity Percentage of people
Walking 63%
Other 31%
Running 31%
Cycling (Recreational) 22%
Swimming 21%
Gym 21%
Cycling (Commuting) 20%
Heavy manual household work 16%
Yoga 14%
Football 13%

Source: Hackney resident health and wellbeing survey (2015)

Data from the Active People Survey show that the vast majority (89%) of the Hackney adult (16+) population are estimated to be doing at least 10 minutes of walking once per week, and 62% at least five times per week (Figure 7).  A quarter of the adult Hackney population are also estimated to cycle (for any duration) at least once per week, with 12% doing so at least three times per week (Figure 8). The sample from the City was too small (25 respondents) to be used for detailed breakdown of types of physical activity among the local resident population. (For more detail on walking and cycling as modes of transport in Hackney and the City, please see the ‘Transport and travel’ section of the ‘Society and environment’ JSNA chapter.)

Figure 7: Frequency of walking in Hackney adult population (age 16+, 2015)

Eighty-nine percent of people walk at least 1 time per week and sixty-two percent at least 5 times per week
Figure 7: Frequency of walking in Hackney adult population (age 16+, 2015)

Source: Active People Survey (2015)

Figure 8: Frequency of cycling in Hackney adult population (age 16+, 2015)

Twenty-five percent of people report cycling at least one time per week, twelve percent at least three times per week
Figure 8: Frequency of cycling in Hackney adult population (age 16+, 2015)

Source: Active People Survey (2015)

Two in five (39%) respondents to the Hackney resident health and wellbeing survey said they were aware of the CMO guidelines on physical activity to maintain/support good health. Reported levels of awareness are the same for those who are currently meeting the guidelines and those who report levels of activity below the recommended levels. 10 This suggests that simply increasing public understanding/awareness of guidelines will not necessarily result in increases in physical activity levels.

The survey also asked people where they do their physical activity. Outdoors, but not in a park, was the most popular option, followed by ‘in a local park’ and ‘at home’, as shown in Table 3.

Table 3: Location of physical activity reported by Hackney adults who do any physical activity (age 16+, 2015)

Location of physical activity Percentage
Outdoors, but not in a park 28%
In a local park 24%
At home 22%
At a council-run leisure centre 12%
At a privately run gym or leisure centre 11%
Somewhere else 3%

Source: Hackney resident health and wellbeing survey (2015)

References

  1. Public Health England, “Public Health Outcomes Framework: percentage of physically inactive adults,” www.phoutcomes.info [accessed 26 October 2016], 2016.
  2. Ipsos MORI, “Health and Wellbeing in Hackney: survey report for Hackney Council,” 2015.
  3. Ipsos MORI, “Health and Wellbeing in Hackney: survey report for Hackney Council,” 2015.
  4. Ipsos MORI, “Health and Wellbeing in Hackney: survey report for Hackney Council,” 2015.
  5. Ipsos MORI, “Health and Wellbeing in Hackney: survey report for Hackney Council,” 2015.
  6. Public Health England, “Public Health Outcomes Framework: percentage of physically inactive adults,” www.phoutcomes.info [accessed 26 October 2016], 2016.
  7. Ipsos MORI, “Health and Wellbeing in Hackney: survey report for Hackney Council,” 2015.
  8. Ipsos MORI, “Health and Wellbeing in Hackney: survey report for Hackney Council,” 2015.
  9. Ipsos MORI, “Health and Wellbeing in Hackney: survey report for Hackney Council,” 2015.
  10. Ipsos MORI, “Health and Wellbeing in Hackney: survey report for Hackney Council,” 2015.