At national level, disabled people are half as likely as non-disabled people to be physically active. Only one in four people with a learning disability take part in physical activity each month, compared to over half of those without a learning disability. 3

We also know that health outcomes associated with physical inactivity are much more common among those with severe mental illness. Analysis of local GP records shows that Hackney residents with severe mental illness, in comparison to residents without diagnosed severe mental illness, are almost two and a half times as likely to have diabetes, almost twice as likely to be obese, and one and a half times as likely to have coronary heart disease. Physical activity contributes to reducing the risk of developing all of these health conditions (see Introduction section).

Local research suggests that physical activity patterns in people with disabilities and mental illness in Hackney are in line with national trends. Findings from the Hackney resident health and wellbeing survey suggest that disabled residents are much less physically active than those without disabilities – more than half (53%) of those with a self-reported mental disability and almost three quarters (72%) of those with a physical disability say they do no vigorous exercise in an average week, compared with 33% of those without any disabilities. 4

References

  1. Public Health England, “Health matters: getting every adult active every day,” 2016.
  2. Ipsos MORI, “Health and Wellbeing in Hackney: survey report for Hackney Council,” 2015.
  3. Public Health England, “Health matters: getting every adult active every day,” 2016.
  4. Ipsos MORI, “Health and Wellbeing in Hackney: survey report for Hackney Council,” 2015.