Certain ethnic groups are at increased risk of diet-related ill-health and disease – such as obesity, diabetes and heart disease (see ‘Adult health and illness’ chapter of the JSNA).

The Hackney resident health and wellbeing survey found that Black residents (28%) and Asian residents (18%) were less likely than average (35%) to say they ate at least five portions of fruit and vegetables a day. 3

Due to the ethnic diversity of the populations of Hackney and the City, it is likely that there is considerable variation in diets and food behaviours locally. A national review of the diets of minority groups in the UK found some key differences, including: 4

  • inner London Black African-Caribbean children were more likely to skip breakfast or have other poor dietary practices, including eating less than one portion of fruit and vegetables each day
  • inner London South Asian children had healthier overall diets, but a higher intake of fizzy drinks
  • south Asian and Black African-Caribbean children have lower dietary intakes of vitamin D and calcium
  • minority ethnic groups are more likely than White populations to meet the ‘5-a-day’ recommendation (this is not consistent with local survey findings for Hackney)
  • second generation children often adopt more western style dietary practices (high fat, sugar and low fruits and vegetables) than their parents.

References

  1. Ipsos MORI, “Health and Wellbeing in Hackney: Survey Report for Hackney Council,” 2015.
  2. G. Leung and S. Stanner, “Diets of minority ethnic groups in the UK: influence on chronic disease risk and implications for prevention.,” Nutrition Bulletin, vol. 36, no. 2, pp. 161-198, 2011.
  3. Ipsos MORI, “Health and Wellbeing in Hackney: Survey Report for Hackney Council,” 2015.
  4. G. Leung and S. Stanner, “Diets of minority ethnic groups in the UK: influence on chronic disease risk and implications for prevention.,” Nutrition Bulletin, vol. 36, no. 2, pp. 161-198, 2011.