‘5-a-day’ – refers to UK government guidelines which recommend consumption of at least five portions of fruit and vegetables per day (400g). High fruit and vegetable intakes are an indicator of a healthy diet and they also correlate with lower risk of obesity and diet-related disease. 1

Free sugars – sugars added to food or those naturally present in honey, syrups and unsweetened fruit juices (but excluding lactose in milk and milk products). This free sugars definition is used by the World Health Organisation (WHO). 2 3

Healthy diet – a diet that balances calorie intake with activity levels, incorporating a wide variety of foods with an emphasis on vegetables, whole fruits, starchy carbohydrates and wholegrains.

Unhealthy diet – a diet that is unbalanced, containing harmful quantities of foods or nutrients that are ‘bad’ for health and/or may be lacking key nutrients. This includes diets low in fruits and vegetables or high in free sugars, fats and salt. 4

Undernutrition – a type of malnutrition (along with over-nutrition), which occurs when an individual does not get enough nutrients, either as a result of an inadequate diet or a problem absorbing nutrients from food. The most common symptom is unintentional or unplanned weight loss. 5

References

  1. World Health Organisation, “Diet, nutrition and the prevention of chronic diseases,” WHO/FAO, 2004.
  2. Public Health England, “Adult Diet Data factsheeet,” ONS, London, 2016.
  3. SACN, “Carbohydrates and Health,” TSO, London, 2015.
  4. World Health Organisation, “Diet, nutrition and the prevention of chronic diseases,” WHO/FAO, 2004.
  5. NHS Choices, “Malnutrition,” NHS , 1 21 2015. [Online]. Available: http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/malnutrition/pages/introduction.aspx. [Accessed 10 October 2016].