In terms of specific work with children and young people, evidence suggests that a ‘whole school’ approach should be adopted, covering everything from policy development and the school environment to staff training, with parents and pupils involved in developing and supporting this. 3 4 This includes development of Personal, Social Health and Economic Education (PSHE) to cover alcohol as a ‘risky behaviour’, and links to social skills and influences, aiming to delay alcohol initiation for young people. As indicated in Table 11 on the Evidence overview section, selective interventions in early childhood are among the most effective, but universal and selective education also has good evidence of efficacy through to adolescence.

References

  1. NICE, “PH7 Alcohol: School Based Interventions,” 2007. [Online]. Available: https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ph7/chapter/2-Public-health-need-and-practice. [Accessed 15 August 2016].
  2. NICE, “QS83: Alcohol: Preventing Harmful Use in the Community,” 2015.
  3. NICE, “PH7 Alcohol: School Based Interventions,” 2007. [Online]. Available: https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ph7/chapter/2-Public-health-need-and-practice. [Accessed 15 August 2016].
  4. NICE, “QS83: Alcohol: Preventing Harmful Use in the Community,” 2015.