Parents with substance misuse issues

The impact of parental substance misuse on children varies with the child’s age. In infancy, this includes impacts on early emotional development. In childhood, parental substance misuse is linked to social isolation and caring responsibilities, and in adolescence with risk-taking behaviour. 7

Female genital mutilation (FGM)

The most common age for FGM varies by culture. Some evidence suggests that FGM is most commonly performed between the ages of five and nine, but it is important to note that it can be carried out at any age from birth into adulthood. 8

Young carers

In London, the likelihood of being a young carer increases steadily with age, from 0.5% of those aged 5-7 recorded as providing unpaid care in 2011 to 5.8% of those aged 18-19. 9

Children with special educational needs (SEN)

The proportion of pupils with SEN support peaks at ages 8/9 to 10/11 at 13-14%, with a sharp drop from age 15/16 (9%) to age 16/17 (4%), the age at which compulsory schooling ends. 10

Youth justice

The chance of being a first-time entrant to the youth justice system increases with age. Six per cent of entrants in 2015 were 10-12 years of age, while 25% were aged 17. 11

Child deaths

In 2015/16, roughly three quarters of child deaths in Hackney and the City were of children under the age of 12 months, with the majority of those at less than 28 days. 12

References

  1. R. Velleman and L. Templeton, “Understanding and modifying the impact of parents’ substance misuse on children,” Advances in Psychiatric Treatment, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 79-89, 2007.
  2. NHS Digital, “Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) Enhanced Dataset 2015/16,” 21 July 2016. [Online]. Available: http://content.digital.nhs.uk/catalogue/PUB21206/fgm-apr-2015-mar-2016-exp-rep.pdf. [Accessed 18 October 2016]
  3. “2011 Census,” Office for National Statistics, 2011
  4. Department for Education, “Special educational needs in England: January 2016,” 21 July 2016. [Online]. Available: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/special-educational-needs-in-england-january-2016. [Accessed 17 October 2016]
  5. Ministry of Justice, “Youth justice annual statistics: 2014 to 2015,” 28 January 2016. [Online]. Available: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/youth-justice-annual-statistics-2014-to-2015. [Accessed 17 October 2016]
  6. City & Hackney Safeguarding Children Board, “Child Death Overview Panel: Annual report 2015/16,” 2016. [Online]. Available: http://www.chscb.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/CDOP_Annual_Report_2015_16.pdf. [Accessed 18 October 2016]
  7. R. Velleman and L. Templeton, “Understanding and modifying the impact of parents’ substance misuse on children,” Advances in Psychiatric Treatment, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 79-89, 2007.
  8. NHS Digital, “Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) Enhanced Dataset 2015/16,” 21 July 2016. [Online]. Available: http://content.digital.nhs.uk/catalogue/PUB21206/fgm-apr-2015-mar-2016-exp-rep.pdf. [Accessed 18 October 2016]
  9. “2011 Census,” Office for National Statistics, 2011
  10. Department for Education, “Special educational needs in England: January 2016,” 21 July 2016. [Online]. Available: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/special-educational-needs-in-england-january-2016. [Accessed 17 October 2016]
  11. Ministry of Justice, “Youth justice annual statistics: 2014 to 2015,” 28 January 2016. [Online]. Available: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/youth-justice-annual-statistics-2014-to-2015. [Accessed 17 October 2016]
  12. City & Hackney Safeguarding Children Board, “Child Death Overview Panel: Annual report 2015/16,” 2016. [Online]. Available: http://www.chscb.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/CDOP_Annual_Report_2015_16.pdf. [Accessed 18 October 2016]