Nationally, deprivation is associated with an increased risk of childhood unintentional injury. Children from socio-economically disadvantaged families have been shown to have an increased rate of accidents and injuries than those from more affluent families. Death rates for injury and poisoning have fallen for all social groups except the poorest, and children in these families are now 13 times more likely to die from these causes than those in the most affluent families. 2

References

  1. Public Health England, “Early Years High Impact Area 5 – Managing minor illness and reducing accidents (reducing hospital attendance / admissions),” [Online]. Available: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/413133/2902452_Early_Years_Impact_5_V0_1W.pdf. [Accessed July 2016]
  2. Public Health England, “Early Years High Impact Area 5 – Managing minor illness and reducing accidents (reducing hospital attendance / admissions),” [Online]. Available: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/413133/2902452_Early_Years_Impact_5_V0_1W.pdf. [Accessed July 2016]