This analysis of within-area inequalities is based on data from each of the six Children’s Centre areas (outlined in Figure 10 below). There were no differences in rates of low birthweight observed over the different geographic areas.

Figure 10: Hackney and City Children’s Centre areas, with stars marking centre locations (2015)

Figure 10: Hackney and City Children’s Centre areas, with stars marking centre locations

Residents of Children’s Centre area A have broadly better outcomes than the rest of the borough – the area sees less smoking recorded at delivery, lower rates of maternal obesity, higher rates of breastfeeding and lower rates of teenage pregnancy.

Residents of Children’s Centre area B are less likely to have poor mental health recorded or be referred to specialist services. This may point to better mental health and lower needs, or lower detection of poor mental health and higher unmet needs. Either way, this appears to be to be driven by the Stamford Hill Orthodox Jewish community – the low rates for this area are particularly pronounced for those with ethnicity recorded as Jewish or Orthodox Jewish. Residents also have lower smoking rates and higher teenage pregnancy, with both these trends also particularly strong in those recorded as Jewish.

The other Children’s Centre areas are all broadly similar to the overall borough picture, with some differences on particular outcomes but no strong patterns of difference. Area C has no differences from the rest of the borough; area D has higher rates of maternal obesity and teen pregnancy; area E has higher rates of maternal obesity and lower teen pregnancy; and area F has lower rates of maternal obesity.