Nationally, obesity is more than twice as common among Year 6 children living in the most deprived areas compared with the least deprived areas (Figure 19). However, there is no association between levels of area deprivation and the proportion of children who are underweight.

Figure 19: National weight groupings in 10-year-old children according to local extent of deprivation (2014/15)

Obesity is more than twice as common among Year 6 children living in the most deprived areas .
Source: National Child Measurement Programme
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Despite high levels of area deprivation across most of Hackney (see the ‘Society and environment’ JSNA chapter), analysis by deprivation within Hackney and the City is possible, albeit with relatively high degrees of uncertainty. Figure 20  demonstrates that, as nationally, lower area deprivation is generally associated with lower obesity prevalence within Hackney and the City, both in Reception Year and Year 6.

Figure 20 : Prevalence of obesity in Hackney and the City by local deprivation quintile(IMD 2010), 2013/14D

Source: National Child Measurement Programme

In related data from the WAY survey, nationally 15 year olds living in deprived areas are much less likely than those in more affluent areas to report being physically active each day for an hour or more, and more likely to be sedentary for more than seven hours a day during the week. 2

Notes

  1. The Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD) uses many indicators across seven domains (income, employment, health and disability, education skills and training, barriers to housing, crime, and living environment) to provide an overall measure of deprivation for each area, relative to other areas within England. Areas have been ranked according to their IMD score and split into 10 groups – from the most deprived 10% of areas (1) to the least deprived 10% of areas (10).
  2. Deprivation quintiles are the most (1) to least (5) deprived 20% of the given population.
  3. The Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD) uses many indicators across seven domains (income, employment, health and disability, education skills and training, barriers to housing, crime, and living environment) to provide an overall measure of deprivation for each area, relative to other areas within England. Areas have been ranked according to their IMD score and split into 10 groups – from the most deprived 10% of areas (1) to the least deprived 10% of areas (10).
  4. Deprivation quintiles are the most (1) to least (5) deprived 20% of the given population.

References

  1. “What About YOUth? survey,” Health and Social Care Information Centre, 2015.
  2. “What About YOUth? survey,” Health and Social Care Information Centre, 2015.