The average number of decayed, missing or filled teeth in five year old children increases with higher area deprivation. 3 Figure 21 also shows that the prevalence of severe or extensive dental decay is around three times higher in the most deprived compared with the least deprived areas, both in five and 15 year olds. In line with the finding that increasing deprivation is linked to increased dental decay, there is evidence that high sugar intake is associated with deprivation 4.

Figure 21: Prevalence of severe or extensive dental decay in England by deprivation quintile (IMD 2010), 2013

The average number of decayed, missing or filled teeth in five year old children increases with higher area deprivation
Source: NHS England Confidence intervals not provided. For a full definition of deprivation quintile, please see Figure 15 and Figure 16

References

  1. “Improving Dental Care and Oral Health – a call to action evidence resource pack,” NHS England, 2013/14
  2. “Sugar Reduction: The evidence for action,” Public Health England, 2015
  3. “Improving Dental Care and Oral Health – a call to action evidence resource pack,” NHS England, 2013/14
  4. “Sugar Reduction: The evidence for action,” Public Health England, 2015