Participation in the National Child Measurement Programme (NCMP) is higher in Hackney and the City than the national average (98.3% of pupils attending state schools in 2014/15, compared with 94.8% in England), and has been so since the programme began.

When the Charedi Reception Year pilot data are factored in to provide a more complete picture of obesity in Hackney and the City, overweight and obesity prevalence remains higher than the London and national averages (Figure 38). However, including these data mean that Hackney and the City falls from having the 7th highest Reception Year prevalence in the country to the 27th highest.

Figure 38: Proportion of Reception Year children in each weight category, 2012-15

Sources: National Child Measurement Programme; locally sourced data

Hackney and the City has among the highest prevalence of Year 6 obesity (state schools only) among comparable local authorities, but the differences are small (Figure 39). Waltham Forest is the only area to have statistically lower prevalence than Hackney. Figure 39 also shows that, on average, prevalence is much higher across London than nationally.

Figure 39: Prevalence of overweight and obesity in Year 6 pupils, 2014/15Hackney and the City has among the highest prevalence of Year 6 obesity among comparable local authorities.

Source: National Child Measurement Programme

Figure 40 shows that the prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity locally, regionally and nationally has remained relatively stable since the first data were collected in 2008/09. Locally, 2014/15 saw the lowest prevalence of overweight and obesity in Reception Year since the NCMP began, but it is not possible from the data to discern if this is a ‘real’ reduction and it is too early to say whether this represents a downward trend. No such pattern is observed for Year 6 overweight and obesity prevalence.

Figure 40 also shows that the phenomenon of overweight and obesity prevalence in Year 6 being double that in Reception Year holds true in London and nationally, as well as locally in Hackney and the City of London.

Figure 40: Trends in childhood overweight and obesity prevalence over time (2008/09-2014/15)

Source: National Child Measurement Programme

 

In related data from the 2015 WAY survey, the proportion of 15 year olds reporting being physically active for at least an hour per day every day for a week varies between 9% and 13% across Hackney’s 10 statistical peers. At 10%, Hackney and the City are towards the lower end of this range and significantly lower than the national average (Figure 41).

Figure 41: Self-reported physical activity of at least one hour per day every day of the last week in 15 year olds (2015)

Source: What About YOUth? (WAY) survey, HSCIC, 2015

When considering sedentary behaviour, the proportion of 15 year olds in this survey reporting a mean weekday daily sedentary time of more than seven hours varies between 65% and 76% among Hackney’s 10 statistical peers. At 71%, Hackney and the City are in the middle of this range and similar to the London and national averages (Figure 42).

Figure 42: Self-reported mean sedentary time of greater than seven hours per day each weekday in 15 year olds (2015)

Source: What About YOUth? survey, HSCIC, 2015

 

The same source reveals that just over half (56%) of Hackney and the City’s 15 year olds report consuming at least five portions of fruit and vegetables per day, again in the middle of the range of Hackney’s statistical peers and slightly better than the national average (Figure 43).

Figure 43: Self-reported consumption of five portions of fruit and vegetables per day in 15 year olds (2015)

Source: What About YOUth? survey, HSCIC, 2015