Persistent disruptive behaviour in school may point to unmet behavioural, emotional or social needs.B

Figure 7 shows that Hackney’s rate of school exclusion due to persistent disruptive behaviour is much higher than the rate in England or London. In particular, it is over twice as high as the rate for most of Hackney’s statistical peers. However, Figure 8 shows that this rate did decrease sharply (by roughly a third) between 2011/12 and 2012/13, a much bigger decrease than in London or England.

No data are available on fixed period exclusions due to persistent disruptive behaviour in the City of London.

Figure 7: Fixed period exclusion due to persistent disruptive behaviour: rate per 100,000 primary, secondary and special school pupils (2012/13)

Figure 7: Fixed period exclusion due to persistent disruptive behaviour: rate per 100,000 primary, secondary and special school pupils (2012/13)

Hackney value statistically significantly higher than England and London.

No data available for City of London.

Data from School Census, analysis by Public Health England.

Figure 8: Fixed period exclusion due to persistent disruptive behaviour over time: rate per 100,000 primary, secondary and special school pupils (2011/12-2012/13)

Figure 8: Fixed period exclusion due to persistent disruptive behaviour over time: rate per 100,000 primary, secondary and special school pupils (2011/12-2012/13)

No data available for City of London.

Data from School Census, analysis by Public Health England.

Notes

  1. Eastman, A. (2011). No Excuses: A review of educational exclusion. Centre for Social Justice http://www.centreforsocialjustice.org.uk/UserStorage/pdf/Pdf%20reports/CSJ_Educational_Exclusion.pdf (PDF document)
  2. Eastman, A. (2011). No Excuses: A review of educational exclusion. Centre for Social Justice http://www.centreforsocialjustice.org.uk/UserStorage/pdf/Pdf%20reports/CSJ_Educational_Exclusion.pdf (PDF document)